209display:inline-block;display:none;174020display:none;1true1trueOriginal ResearchOriginal ResearchOriginal Researchoriginal-researchtoc-heading193 <h3 class="BHead">Background</h3> Impostor phenomenon is the overwhelming feeling of intellectual phoniness and has been linked to decreased job satisfaction and increased levels of stress, depression and burnout. As education and healthcare institutions rely on simulation to train the current and future healthcare workforce, there is a need to improve our understanding of impostor phenomenon in the healthcare simulation context. This study investigated the prevalence of impostor phenomenon in simulation educators and examined the effect of work-related characteristics on impostor phenomenon in the simulation educator community. <h3 class="BHead">Methods</h3> In total, 148 simulation educators from nine countries participated in an online survey. Along with questions related to demographic characteristics, impostor phenomenon was measured using two scales, the Clance Impostor Phenomenon Scale (CIPS) and the Leary Impostorism Scale (LIS). Independent variables included gender, time spent on simulation activities per week, years working in simulation and team size. <h3 class="BHead">Results</h3> Impostorism was identified in 46.6% of simulation educators. A multivariate analysis of variance revealed no statistically significant interactions or main effects of gender, time spent on simulation activities per week, years working in simulation and team size on impostor phenomenon. Impostor phenomenon does not discriminate based on gender; it does not disappear with experience; and it is present regardless of the size of team. <h3 class="BHead">Conclusions</h3> Impostor phenomenon is prevalent across the healthcare simulation educator community. Given the negative impact impostor phenomenon has on well-being and career development, educators, employers and professional societies need to acknowledge the prevalence of impostor phenomenon and start a conversation to build awareness about impostor phenomenon in the healthcare simulation community. Bringing the conversation into the open is the first step to acknowledging feelings of impostorism and developing strategies to break the cycle. 168Impostor phenomenon in healthcare simulation educatorsArticle16560558496825ZhD8IABEgXBsCdHzJFq5ZhD8IABEgXBsCdHzJFqtrueImpostor phenomenon in healthcare simulation educators2022falseAdi Health+WellnessImpostor phenomenon in healthcare simulation educators110.54531/zmtl172<p><sup>1 </sup>Office of Education, Duke NUS Medical School, Singapore</p><p><b>Corresponding author:</b> Kirsty J Freeman, <a href="mailto:Kirsty.Freeman@duke-nus.edu.sg">Kirsty.Freeman@duke-nus.edu.sg</a>; Twitter: @kirstyfreeman0</p>kirsty-j-freemanAUTHORKirsty J Freeman193502<p><sup>2 </sup>Graduate School of Education, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia</p>stephen-houghtonAUTHORStephen Houghton193503<p><sup>3 </sup>Division of Health Professions Education, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia</p>sandra-e-carrAUTHORSandra E Carr193504<p><sup>4 </sup>School of Clinical Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia</p><p><sup>5 </sup>Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia</p>debra-nestelAUTHORtrueDebra Nestel193505true1trueEditorialEditorialEditorialeditorialtoc-heading1923Introducing a new initiative: Short Reports on Simulation Innovations Supplement (SRSIS)Article16560689414645JiIuIABEgXBsCdHEJG05JiIuIABEgXBsCdHEJG0trueIntroducing a new initiative: Short Reports on Simulation Innovations Supplement (SRSIS)2022falseAdi Health+WellnessIntroducing a new initiative: Short Reports on Simulation Innovations Supplement (SRSIS)110.54531/ytal729<p><sup>1 </sup>Department of Surgery (Division of Emergency Medicine) &amp; The Gordon Center for Simulation &amp; Innovation in Medical Education, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA</p><p><b>Corresponding author:</b> Asit Misra, <a href="mailto:asitmisra@hotmail.com">asitmisra@hotmail.com</a></p>asit-misraAUTHORAsit Misra192568<p><sup>2 </sup>Department of Emergency Medicine (Division of Simulation), Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA</p>rami-a.-ahmedAUTHORtrueRami A. Ahmed192569true1trueProtocolsProtocolsProtocolsprotocolstoc-heading191 <h3 class="BHead">Background</h3> Simulation-based education can be an effective strategy to educate nurses and physicians across the continuum of cancer care. However, there is still a lack of studies collating and synthesizing the literature around the types, functionalities and delivery systems of simulation-based education to educate different professional groups about cancer care. <h3 class="BHead">Aim</h3> To collate and synthesize the literature on how simulation has been used to educate nurses and physicians about cancer care. <h3 class="BHead">Methods</h3> Scoping review methodology according to the Joanna Briggs Institute framework. Published literature is going to be searched through Medline (OVID), CINAHL, EMBASE and PsycINFO. Unpublished literature will be searched through ResearchGate, OpenGrey and open access theses and dissertations. Articles will be considered if the population is nurses (including nurse practitioners) and/or physicians, if they use any type of simulation as an educational strategy as the concept of interest, and if the context is cancer care. This review will consider experimental, quasi-experimental, observational, quantitative and qualitative studies designs, text and opinion papers and unpublished literature. <h3 class="BHead">Expected results</h3> Results from this scoping review will generate a solid underpinning for nursing and medical community to empower evidenced innovation through the further development of simulation-based educational interventions. 3The use of simulation-based education in cancer care: a scoping review protocolArticle165606895944245gEs4ABEgXBsCdHBZG545gEs4ABEgXBsCdHBZG5trueThe use of simulation-based education in cancer care: a scoping review protocol2022falseAdi Health+WellnessThe use of simulation-based education in cancer care: a scoping review protocol110.54531/dlvs9567<p><sup>1 </sup>School of Nursing, Queen’s University, 99 University Ave, ON , Kingston, K7L 3N6, Canada</p><p><b>Corresponding author:</b> Amina Silva, <a href="mailto:aminareginasilva@gmail.com">aminareginasilva@gmail.com</a></p>amina-silvaAUTHORAmina Silva191591<p><sup>1 </sup>School of Nursing, Queen’s University, 99 University Ave, ON , Kingston, K7L 3N6, Canada</p>jacqueline-galicaAUTHORJacqueline Galica191592<p><sup>1 </sup>School of Nursing, Queen’s University, 99 University Ave, ON , Kingston, K7L 3N6, Canada</p>kevin-wooAUTHORKevin Woo191593<p><sup>1 </sup>School of Nursing, Queen’s University, 99 University Ave, ON , Kingston, K7L 3N6, Canada</p>amanda-ross-whiteAUTHORAmanda Ross-White191594<p><sup>1 </sup>School of Nursing, Queen’s University, 99 University Ave, ON , Kingston, K7L 3N6, Canada</p>marian-luctkar-fludeAUTHORtrueMarian Luctkar-Flude191595true1trueOriginal ResearchOriginal ResearchOriginal Researchoriginal-researchtoc-heading190 <h3 class="BHead">Introduction</h3> Since the origins of surgery, simulation has played an important role in surgical education, particularly in plastic and reconstructive surgery. This has greater relevance in contemporary settings of reduced clinical exposure resulting in limited work-based learning opportunities. With changing surgical curricula, it is prescient to examine the role of simulation in plastic and reconstructive surgery. <h3 class="BHead">Methods</h3> A scoping review protocol was used to identify relevant studies, with an iterative process identifying, reviewing and charting the data to derive reported outcomes and themes. <h3 class="BHead">Results</h3> Of the 554 studies identified, 52 studies were included in this review. The themes identified included simulator modalities, curriculum elements targeted and relevant surgical competencies. There was a predominance of synthetically based simulators, targeting technical skills largely associated with microsurgery, paediatric surgery and craniomaxillofacial surgery. <h3 class="BHead">Discussion</h3> Existing simulators largely address high-complexity procedures. There are multiple under-represented areas, including low-complexity procedures and simulation activities addressing communication, collaboration, management and leadership. There are many opportunities for simulation in surgical education, which requires a contextual appreciation of educational theory. Simulation may be used both as a learning method and as an assessment tool. <h3 class="BHead">Conclusion</h3> This review describes the literature relating to simulation in plastic and reconstructive surgery and proposes opportunities for incorporating simulation in a broader sense, in the surgical curriculum. 3Simulation in plastic and reconstructive surgery: a scoping reviewArticle16560689462134phtdYABEgXBsCdHDpHc4phtdYABEgXBsCdHDpHctrueSimulation in plastic and reconstructive surgery: a scoping review2022falseAdi Health+WellnessSimulation in plastic and reconstructive surgery: a scoping review110.54531/hnpw7177<p><sup>1 </sup>Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery Unit, Peninsula Health, Frankston, Australia</p><p><sup>2 </sup>Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia</p><p><b>Corresponding author:</b> Marc A Seifman, <a href="mailto:marc@marcseifman.com">marc@marcseifman.com</a></p>marc-a-seifmanAUTHORMarc A Seifman190570<p><sup>1 </sup>Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand Surgery Unit, Peninsula Health, Frankston, Australia</p>abby-b-youngAUTHORAbby B Young190571<p><sup>2 </sup>Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia</p>debra-nestelAUTHORtrueDebra Nestel190572true1trueArticleArticleArticlearticletoc-heading1863Discovering careers in mental health: a qualitative pilot study of a novel simulation-based education programmeArticle16560689494122phbb38BEgXBsCdH7pFh2phbb38BEgXBsCdH7pFhtrueDiscovering careers in mental health: a qualitative pilot study of a novel simulation-based education programme2022falseAdi Health+WellnessDiscovering careers in mental health: a qualitative pilot study of a novel simulation-based education programme110.54531/tzae8485<p><sup>1 </sup>Maudsley Simulation, South London &amp; Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK</p><p><sup>3 </sup>Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College, London, UK</p><p><b>Corresponding author:</b> Divija Bansal, <a href="mailto:divijabansal12@gmail.com">divijabansal12@gmail.com</a></p>divija-bansalAUTHORDivija Bansal186573<p><sup>1 </sup>Maudsley Simulation, South London &amp; Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK</p><p><sup>2 </sup>Maudsley Learning, South London &amp; Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK</p>marta-ortega-vegaAUTHORMarta Ortega Vega186574<p><sup>1 </sup>Maudsley Simulation, South London &amp; Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK</p><p><sup>2 </sup>Maudsley Learning, South London &amp; Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK</p>chris-attoeAUTHORChris Attoe186575<p><sup>2 </sup>Maudsley Learning, South London &amp; Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK</p><p><sup>3 </sup>Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College, London, UK</p>sean-crossAUTHORSean Cross186576<p><sup>1 </sup>Maudsley Simulation, South London &amp; Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK</p><p><sup>2 </sup>Maudsley Learning, South London &amp; Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK</p>sandra-parishAUTHORtrueSandra Parish186577true1trueLetterLetterLetterlettertoc-heading1873The use of Lego® bricks to train novice debriefersArticle165606896179425hdb38BEgXBsCdH7JEH25hdb38BEgXBsCdH7JEHtrueThe use of Lego® bricks to train novice debriefers2022falseAdi Health+WellnessThe use of Lego® bricks to train novice debriefers110.54531/kupp8710<p><sup>1 </sup>EESOA Simulation Center, Rome, Italy</p>giorgio-capognaAUTHORGiorgio Capogna187596<p><sup>2 </sup>Centro di Simulazione (CeSi) at the Centro Professionale Sociosanitario, Lugano, Switzerland</p>pier-luigi-ingrassiaAUTHORPier Luigi Ingrassia187597<p><sup>1 </sup>EESOA Simulation Center, Rome, Italy</p><p><b>Corresponding author:</b> Emanuele Capogna, <a href="mailto:capogna.eesoa@gmail.com">capogna.eesoa@gmail.com</a></p>emanuele-capognaAUTHOREmanuele Capogna187598<p><sup>3 </sup>Centro Interdipartimentale di Didattica Innovativa e di Simulazione in Medicina e Professioni Sanitarie, SIMNOVA, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy</p>michela-bernardiniAUTHORtrueMichela Bernardini187599true1trueKey ConceptsKey ConceptsKey Conceptskey-conceptstoc-heading1883Focus groups in Healthcare SimulationArticle16560689641413JjAb38BEgXBsCdHOJEF3JjAb38BEgXBsCdHOJEFtrueFocus groups in Healthcare Simulation2022falseAdi Health+WellnessFocus groups in Healthcare Simulation110.54531/yamj2519<p>Centre for Learning Innovation and Simulation, The Michener Institute of Education at UHN, Toronto, Canada</p><p><a href="mailto:nmcnaughton565@gmail.com">nmcnaughton565@gmail.com</a></p>nancy-mcnaughtonAUTHORtrueNancy McNaughton188600true1trueEditorialEditorialEditorialeditorialtoc-heading1834ASPiH 2021 Conference - Moving Upstream: Using simulation to improve systemsArticle16536946839632Zhckn4BEgXBsCdHv5GV2Zhckn4BEgXBsCdHv5GVtrueASPiH 2021 Conference - Moving Upstream: Using simulation to improve systems2022falseAdi Health+WellnessASPiH 2021 Conference - Moving Upstream: Using simulation to improve systems110.54531/wgmh9519 <p class="captionText"><sup>1Clinical Skills, NHS Education, UK</sup></p> <p class="captionText"><sup>2Scottish Centre for Simulation and Clinical Human Factors, Larbert, UK</sup></p> <p class="captionText"><sup>3Forth Valley Royal Hospital, Larbert, UK</sup></p>michael-moneypennyAUTHORMichael Moneypenny183475 <p class="captionText"><sup>4Institute of Lifecourse Development, University of Greenwich, London, UK</sup></p> <p class="captionText"><sup>5Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK</sup></p> <p class="captionText"><sup>6Imperial College London, London, UK</sup></p>sharon-weldonAUTHORSharon Weldon183476 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>University Southampton</institution>, Southampton, <country>UK</country></sup></p>carrie-hamiltonAUTHORCarrie Hamilton183246 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Institute of Medical Sciences Canterbury Christ Church University</institution>, <country>United Kingdom</country></sup></p> <p class="captionText"><sup><corresp id="c1"><b>Corresponding author:</b> Andy Buttery, <a href="mailto:andy.buttery@canterbury.ac.uk">andy.buttery@canterbury.ac.uk</a></corresp></sup></p>andy-butteryAUTHORAndy Buttery18322 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>School of Health and Social Work, University of Hertfordshire</institution>, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, <country>UK</country></sup></p> <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>4<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Hamad Medical Corporation Ambulance Service</institution>, Doha, <country>Qatar</country></sup></p> <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>5<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Weill Cornell Medicine</institution> – <country>Qatar</country></sup></p>guillaume-alinierAUTHORtrueGuillaume Alinier18333true1trueEssayEssayEssayessaytoc-heading181 <h3 class="BHead">Introduction</h3> The COVID-19 pandemic has affected gynaecology trainees in the United Kingdom by reducing operating theatre experience. Simulators are widely used for operative laparoscopy but not for practising laparoscopic-entry techniques. We devised a low-cost simulator to help trainees achieve the skill. Our aim was to pilot this low-cost simulator to perform Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) supervised learning events. <h3 class="BHead">Methods</h3> A single-centre pilot study involving six gynaecology trainees in a structured training session. Interactive PowerPoint teaching was followed by trainees’ demonstration of laparoscopic entry for a supervised learning event and personalized feedback. Participants completed pre- and post-course questionnaires. <h3 class="BHead">Results</h3> All the trainees found the training useful to the score of 10 (scale of 1–10) and recommended this to be included in Deanery teaching. Personalized feedback was described as the most useful. The simulator was rated as good as a real-life patient relative to the skill being taught. <h3 class="BHead">Discussion</h3> Gynaecology trainees are affected by lack of hands-on experience in the operating theatre for performing laparoscopic entry. A low-cost abdominal laparoscopy entry simulator can help deliver the RCOG curriculum, enabling trainees to achieve required competencies. 3Novel do-it-yourself low-cost abdominal laparoscopy entry simulator for gynaecology traineesArticle16560689526261ZjBU34BEgXBsCdHTpGZ1ZjBU34BEgXBsCdHTpGZtrueNovel do-it-yourself low-cost abdominal laparoscopy entry simulator for gynaecology trainees2022falseAdi Health+WellnessNovel do-it-yourself low-cost abdominal laparoscopy entry simulator for gynaecology trainees110.54531/EEIC5466<p><sup>1 </sup>Hull Institute of Learning and Simulation, Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Kingston Upon Hull, Anlaby Road, HU3 2J, UK</p><p><b>Corresponding author:</b> Kamalaveni Soundararajan, <a href="mailto:kamhull21@gmail.com">kamhull21@gmail.com</a></p>kamalaveni-soundararajanAUTHORKamalaveni Soundararajan181578<p><sup>2 </sup>School of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, North /East Yorkshire and Humber, Health Education England, Health House, Grange Park Lane, Willerby, Hull HU10 6DT, UK</p>karthikadevi-sivakumarAUTHORKarthikadevi Sivakumar181579<p><sup>1 </sup>Hull Institute of Learning and Simulation, Hull University Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Kingston Upon Hull, Anlaby Road, HU3 2J, UK</p>andrew-blackmoreAUTHORAndrew Blackmore181580<p><sup>2 </sup>School of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, North /East Yorkshire and Humber, Health Education England, Health House, Grange Park Lane, Willerby, Hull HU10 6DT, UK</p>marina-flynnAUTHORtrueMarina Flynn181581true1trueProtocolsProtocolsProtocolsprotocolstoc-heading180 <h3 class="BHead">Introduction</h3> Effective teamwork remains a crucial component in providing high-quality care to patients in today’s complex healthcare environment. A prevalent ‘us’ versus ‘them’ mentality among professions, however, impedes reliable team function in the clinical setting. More importantly, its corrosive influence extends to health professional students who model the ineffective behaviour as they learn from practicing clinicians. Simulation-based training (SBT) of health professional students in team-based competencies recognized to improve performance could potentially mitigate such negative influences. This quasi-experimental prospective study will evaluate the effectiveness and impact of incorporating a multi-year, health science centre-wide SBT curriculum for interprofessional student teams. It targets health professional students from the Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Allied Health at Louisiana State University (LSU) Health New Orleans. <h3 class="BHead">Methods and analysis</h3> The intervention will teach interprofessional student teams key team-based competencies for highly reliable team behaviour using SBT. The study will use the Kirkpatrick framework to evaluate training effectiveness. Primary outcomes will focus on the impact of the training on immediate improvements in team-based skills and attitudes (Level 2). Secondary outcomes include students’ perception of the SBT (Level 1), its immediate impact on attitudes towards interprofessional education (Level 2) and its impact on team-based attitudes over time (Level 3). <h3 class="BHead">Ethics and dissemination</h3> The Institutional Review Board at LSU Health New Orleans approved this research as part of an exempt protocol with a waiver of documentation of informed consent due to its educational nature. The research description for participants provides information on the nature of the project, privacy, dissemination of results and opting out of the research. 3Team Training for Interprofessional Insight, Networking and Guidance (T<sup>2</sup>IPING) points: a study protocolArticle16560689559271JhxL34BEgXBsCdHn5Fg1JhxL34BEgXBsCdHn5FgtrueTeam Training for Interprofessional Insight, Networking and Guidance (T<sup>2</sup>IPING) points: a study protocol2022falseAdi Health+WellnessTeam Training for Interprofessional Insight, Networking and Guidance (T<sup>2</sup>IPING) points: a study protocol110.54531/FQAX8042<p><sup>1 </sup>Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University (LSU) Health New Orleans School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA</p><p><b>Corresponding author:</b> John T. Paige, <a href="mailto:jpaige@lsuhsc.edu">jpaige@lsuhsc.edu</a></p>john-t-paigeAUTHORJohn T Paige180582<p><sup>2 </sup>Nurse Anesthesia Program, LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, New Orleans, LA</p>laura-s-bonannoAUTHORLaura S Bonanno180583<p><sup>3 </sup>Office of the Dean, LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, New Orleans, LA</p>deborah-d-garbeeAUTHORDeborah D Garbee180584<p><sup>4 </sup>Department of Biostatistics, LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, New Orleans, LA</p>qingzhao-yuAUTHORQingzhao Yu180585<p><sup>5 </sup>Bellingham, WA</p>vladimir-j-kiselovAUTHORVladimir J Kiselov180586<p><sup>2 </sup>Nurse Anesthesia Program, LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, New Orleans, LA</p>jennifer-a-badeauxAUTHORJennifer A Badeaux180587<p><sup>2 </sup>Nurse Anesthesia Program, LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, New Orleans, LA</p>jennifer-b-martinAUTHORJennifer B Martin180588<p><sup>2 </sup>Nurse Anesthesia Program, LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, New Orleans, LA</p>david-m-kalilAUTHORDavid M Kalil180589<p><sup>2 </sup>Nurse Anesthesia Program, LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, New Orleans, LA</p>raymond-j-devlinAUTHORtrueRaymond J Devlin180590true1truePerspectivesPerspectivesPerspectivesperspectivestoc-heading28<p class="para" id="N65539"><b>What?</b> In 2019, we carried out our first experimental large-scale simulation exercise with great success. The initial findings of the study were presented at ASPiH 2019. This is an update on our journey using large-scale inter-professional simulation (IPE). From our initial simulation, we identified the following key themes: (1) students’ educational expectations; (2) their experience of multi-disciplinary working; (3) the theory to practice gap and (4) gaining experience in a safe environment. From this, we realized that our students needed more of this type of simulation activity and that the hands-off facilitation style that we used helped with learning and preparation for practice. Students responded positively to having to put their leadership skills into practice, learning in a safe environment in a real-time situation, something that, despite great placements, they often felt unable to do in the ‘real world’. This real-time simulation-enhanced innovative thinking and emphasized human factor principles. This type of learning experience promoted learning and working together across the multi-disciplinary field with both qualified and pre-registration students. The impact of working with ‘qualified’ professionals added to the realism of the simulation. We found that the debrief was key in the development of real-time simulation as it was enhanced by good-quality debriefing.</p> <p class="para" id="N65544"><b>So what?</b> Following the initial large-scale simulation, we planned and delivered two more events before COVID-19 prevented us from continuing. Both were large-scale events, but we made adaptations each time to enhance the students’ learning experience. What we have managed to achieve over the lockdown period is to plan and prepare for further events and, in hindsight, this has better prepared us. So, what have we done in this period of enforced distancing? We have gone through a period of change management to align all our curriculum to being simulation-based, and have developed and implemented a framework for the integration of skills and simulation. We have sent (nearly) all our lecturing staff from across our courses, nursing, operating department practitioner, midwifery, paramedic, trainee nursing associate and social work on a simulation train the trainer course to understand the pedagogy and discipline that is the backbone of simulation. This has been a great success and has generated a lot of inter-professional conversations and development of simulation. We have designed and developed a large-scale simulation that can be run in a COVID compliant way.</p> 4163 Go Big or Go Home: The Use of Large-Scale SimulationArticle1653694685802PZjx6n0BEgXBsCdHB5FkPZjx6n0BEgXBsCdHB5Fktrue163 Go Big or Go Home: The Use of Large-Scale Simulation2021falseAdi Health+Wellness163 Go Big or Go Home: The Use of Large-Scale Simulation110.54531/GTXK7794 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Staffordshire University</institution>, Shrewsbury, <country>UK</country></sup></p>emily-browneAUTHOREmily Browne2845 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Staffordshire University</institution>, Shrewsbury, <country>UK</country></sup></p>joseph-natalelloAUTHORtrueJoseph Natalello2846true1trueIn PracticeIn PracticeIn Practicein-practicetoc-heading27<h3 class="BHead">Background:</h3> <i>In situ</i> simulation is an emerging tool used to test systems, improve patient safety outcomes and prepare staff working in new clinical environments <sup>[1,2]</sup>. Our department opened a new Paediatric Assessment Unit (PAU) in April 2021, which sees an average of 470 patients each month. <h3 class="BHead">Aim:</h3> The aim of the study was to use simulated learning events (SLEs) to assess the effect of a new environment on performance, interpersonal skills and system-based practice. As part of the wider paediatric improvement plan, the simulation programme has been used to enhance teamwork and implement a change to maximize patient safety. <h3 class="BHead">Method:</h3> Five multi-disciplinary SLEs based on paediatric and neonatal emergencies were held over a month following the opening of the new PAU. The simulations were low fidelity and <i>in situ</i>, using static models and facilitator feedback, and were held in the new PAU. Observations were displayed on tablets using the REALITi simulation app by iSimulate. A ‘description, analysis, application’ diamond debrief was held following each SLE, and feedback was collected via an online questionnaire. Latent strengths and safety errors were identified and shared with the wider working group to implement a change. Safety errors were then re-assessed at subsequent SLEs to demonstrate resolution. <h3 class="BHead">Results:</h3> Ten latent errors were identified pertaining to the availability of equipment and medications; all were rectified within 2 weeks. Operational errors were also identified, including unfamiliarity with the new PAU location within the wider emergency team, leading to delayed attendance to the simulation. The time taken to attend the PAU by the anaesthetic team decreased by 69% once the emergency bleep message was amended with location instructions. We observed that, with each SLE, there were successive improvements in teamwork and operational behaviours. The teams were able to familiarize themselves with each other and the new working environment, consequently leading to reduced times on acquiring equipment for the emergency. There were a total of 20 participants from paediatric, anaesthetic and nursing backgrounds. Feedback was received from 55% of participants, of which all agreed or strongly agreed that the SLEs and debriefs contributed to their learning and helped develop their team-working and leadership skills. <h3 class="BHead">Implications for practice:</h3> SLE is an effective tool for systems testing in a new clinical environment and helps to identify potential critical and non-critical safety risks. We will continue to develop our simulation programme to assess a variety of clinical environments and share learning from the latent strengths and errors with the multi-disciplinary team, to improve clinical processes, team working and patient safety outcomes. 4110 Using Simulation to Assess Systems and Processes in a New Paediatric UnitArticle1653694695216PJjw6n0BEgXBsCdH_5E9PJjw6n0BEgXBsCdH_5E9true110 Using Simulation to Assess Systems and Processes in a New Paediatric Unit2021falseAdi Health+Wellness110 Using Simulation to Assess Systems and Processes in a New Paediatric Unit110.54531/RSRY1468 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>North Middlesex Hospital NHS Trust</institution>, London, <country>UK</country></sup></p>hanna-tillyAUTHORHanna Tilly2741 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>North Middlesex Hospital NHS Trust</institution>, London, <country>UK</country></sup></p>rhea-bisheswarAUTHORRhea Bisheswar2742 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>North Middlesex Hospital NHS Trust</institution>, London, <country>UK</country></sup></p>matthew-rubensAUTHORMatthew Rubens2743 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>North Middlesex Hospital NHS Trust</institution>, London, <country>UK</country></sup></p>dalbir-sohiAUTHORtrueDalbir Sohi2744true1trueIn PracticeIn PracticeIn Practicein-practicetoc-heading34<h3 class="BHead">Background:</h3> COVID-19 created pressure on healthcare institutions to quickly prepare for maximum capacities. To meet the critical care capacity challenges, non-critical care nurses and overseas short-term temporary contracted nurses needed to be urgently deployed to the critical care units. That quick deployment and recruitment process raised concern about competence and patient safety; therefore, the deployed nurses were upskilled using fast track simulation-based education (SBE). SBE is an effective method to manage quick, focussed upskilling training, helping to improve patient care and safety <sup>[1]</sup>. <h3 class="BHead">Aim:</h3> The aim of the study was to explore the effectiveness of the COVID-19 SBE upskilling program on perceived satisfaction, confidence and competence of deployed nurses. <h3 class="BHead">Method:</h3> Upskilling of 1200 non-critical care nurses was conducted using SBE between 14 March and 1 June 2021 during the country’s second wave of COVID-19. Training consisted of completing a mandatory 2-hour online critical care introductory module that included information on COVID-19 (the disease, pathophysiology), the critical care environment, critical care scope of service and infection control strategies. The online module was followed by 4 hours of in-person SBE using a demonstration and return demonstration approach. Considering the urgency of the situation and time constraints, skills were selected and prioritized according to patient safety and included care of the patient receiving mechanical ventilation, invasive line monitoring and care, recognition of deterioration, proning, and assessment of patient response to interventions. Post SBE, a survey was administered to collect data on the perceived satisfaction, confidence and competence of the nurses being deployed. <h3 class="BHead">Results:</h3> The majority of the nurses reported confidence in their new skills (97%), while 96% perceived themselves as competent after successful completion of SBEs. The nurses were highly satisfied with the training effectiveness (92%), and 99% believed that they were able to successfully achieve the learning objectives. Specifics about perceived competence and confidence per survey item will be reported in the presentation. The SBE upskilling programme was evaluated as an effective way to learn how to manage critically ill patients. <h3 class="BHead">Implications for practice:</h3> Nurses perceived themselves as confident and competent after participating in SBE. However, competence confirmation will be evaluated either in further SBE or through actual competency assessment in the clinical setting by trained competency validators. Nurses could perceive themselves as confident and competent but still perform incorrectly. Fast track SBEs should not be used to confirm full competence due to the inability to provide repetition of skills practice. 477 Fast Track Simulation-Based Education for COVID-19 DeploymentArticle1653694699830OZjc6n0BEgXBsCdHDZHbOZjc6n0BEgXBsCdHDZHbtrue77 Fast Track Simulation-Based Education for COVID-19 Deployment2021falseAdi Health+Wellness77 Fast Track Simulation-Based Education for COVID-19 Deployment110.54531/XTPQ6984 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Hamad Medical Corporation</institution>, Doha, <country>Qatar</country></sup></p>emad-almomaniAUTHOREmad Almomani3454 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Hamad Medical Corporation</institution>, Doha, <country>Qatar</country></sup></p>jacqueline-sullivanAUTHORJacqueline Sullivan3455 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Hamad Medical Corporation</institution>, Doha, <country>Qatar</country></sup></p>jesveena-mathiasAUTHORJesveena Mathias3456 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Hamad Medical Corporation</institution>, Doha, <country>Qatar</country></sup></p>kimberly-leightonAUTHORtrueKimberly Leighton3457true1trueIn PracticeIn PracticeIn Practicein-practicetoc-heading29<h3 class="BHead">Background:</h3> The national lockdowns due to COVID-19 have caused significant disruption to schools and colleges. As well as interruption to their studies, pupils work-experience placements have been cancelled, particularly those based in healthcare. Despite this, the BMA continues to recommend all aspiring doctors undertake placements within healthcare to aid their application to medical school and give them an insight into being a doctor <sup>[1]</sup>. Additionally, for students from low-income families or those with no ties to healthcare, voluntary placements are often the only opportunity to learn about the various roles of doctors. <h3 class="BHead">Aims:</h3> Creating a ‘virtual work experience’ using simulated video demonstrations in order for students to gain an understanding of what working as a doctor encompasses. This course was offered free of charge to help encourage students, particularly from low-income households. <h3 class="BHead">Method:</h3> Invitation letters were sent to all public and private schools in Merseyside. Contact details and school information were obtained through the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (OFSTED) Government website. Students were asked to fill out a pre- and post-course questionnaire. <h3 class="BHead">Results:</h3> Seventy-five schools and colleges were invited. A total of 326 students registered for the course and 220 participated in the virtual conference. All participants were from 18 schools and colleges. Students, where at least one parent had attended university, felt more confident in applying to medical school and securing a place, this was significantly higher when a parent was in the medical profession. Students from private or schools rated as above average by OFSTED felt that they were more likely to apply to medicine than those in schools who were rated average or below-average. Overall, students felt that they had an improved understanding of the different roles of doctors following the course and the simulated scenarios were most useful in encouraging them to apply to medicine. <h3 class="BHead">Implication for practice:</h3> Up to 20% of secondary schools provide 80% of all applicants to medicine, with half of the schools in the UK not providing any applicants to medicine at all. The selection alliance 2019 report on widening participation in UK medical schools suggested that there continues to be a discrepancy in underprivileged students applying to study medicine with barriers including limitations to securing work-experience placements <sup>[2]</sup>. Virtual work experience and the use of simulation may be useful in providing work experience and encouraging those from low-income households to apply to medicine. 4190 Virtual Work Experience in Medicine: Widening ParticipationArticle1653694696636Ppjx6n0BEgXBsCdHFJGePpjx6n0BEgXBsCdHFJGetrue190 Virtual Work Experience in Medicine: Widening Participation2021falseAdi Health+Wellness190 Virtual Work Experience in Medicine: Widening Participation110.54531/HQOE6610 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Liverpool University Hospital Trust</institution>, Liverpool, <country>UK</country></sup></p>fatemeh-keshtkarAUTHORFatemeh Keshtkar2935 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Liverpool University Hospital Trust</institution>, Liverpool, <country>UK</country></sup></p>laura-ellertonAUTHORLaura Ellerton2936 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Liverpool University Hospital Trust</institution>, Liverpool, <country>UK</country></sup></p>ryan-kellyAUTHORRyan Kelly2937 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Liverpool University Hospital Trust</institution>, Liverpool, <country>UK</country></sup></p>tim-parrAUTHORTim Parr2938 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Liverpool University Hospital Trust</institution>, Liverpool, <country>UK</country></sup></p>simon-mercerAUTHORtrueSimon Mercer2939true1trueIn PracticeIn PracticeIn Practicein-practicetoc-heading32<h3 class="BHead">Background:</h3> The Clinical Skills and Simulation Centre (CSSC) at Edge Hill University (EHU) was opened in September 2019 to enhance and standardize simulation-based education across all programmes in the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Medicine. Before the CSSC opened, academic staff had not received any formal guidance in using simulation-based education. With the impact of the pandemic, a three-step blended simulation faculty development approach was created to assist and support faculty in their understanding and in the delivery of simulation <sup>[1,2]</sup>. <h3 class="BHead">Aim:</h3> The aim of the study was to enhance, encourage and standardize the use of simulation-based education through the delivery of a three-step faculty development programme. <h3 class="BHead">Method:</h3> The following are the three-step approach to faculty development: Step 1:The introduction of simulation sessions is specifically designed and focussed on the newly appointed academic faculty and is embedded in the staff induction programme. Step 2:Writing simulation scenarios, drop-in sessions are run once a month and are available to all academics from the faculty. They focus on designing and writing simulation scenarios. Step 3:Shadowing and feedback. At this stage, faculty are offered support during their simulation session. The experienced simulation facilitator leads the first part of the event with the faculty member running the second part supported by the facilitator observing and providing feedback after the session. The evaluative methods included two approaches, quantitative incorporating Likert questionnaires, for evaluations, and qualitative focus groups, for faculty. Approximately 1700 student and faculty evaluations were obtained, and seven faculty members participated in the focus groups. These were obtained and conducted between June 2020 and August 2021. <h3 class="BHead">Results:</h3> Evaluations are obtained from students and from faculty who are involved in the sessions. In addition, ethical approval has been obtained to carry out focus groups to identify the challenges and benefits that faculty have found in delivering simulation. Feedback from the evaluations and the focus groups were very positive. Examples include: The simulation team have been extremely supportive and always are. It makes my role so much easier and I appreciate all their hard work. We had 450 students over a fortnight, everyone worked so hard and were very supportive, especially to staff who had not facilitated simulation for some time. Data from June 2020 to August 2021 The session: Was beneficial for my learning, 87.74% Archived the learning outcomes, 91.37% Did the session meet your expectations? 87.32% <h3 class="BHead">Implications for practice:</h3> We will continue to offer a blended approach and, from August 2021, a 1-day simulation facilitation programme will be offered to potential adjunct clinical faculty. 471 Step by Step: A Three-Step Approach to Faculty DevelopmentArticle1653694698273QZjx6n0BEgXBsCdHL5EJQZjx6n0BEgXBsCdHL5EJtrue71 Step by Step: A Three-Step Approach to Faculty Development2021falseAdi Health+Wellness71 Step by Step: A Three-Step Approach to Faculty Development110.54531/YVZM5555 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Edge Hill University</institution>, <country>UK</country></sup></p>agnieszka-sumeraAUTHORAgnieszka Sumera3250 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Edge Hill University</institution>, <country>UK</country></sup></p>helen-hendersonAUTHORHelen Henderson3251 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Edge Hill University</institution>, <country>UK</country></sup></p>ian-ballardAUTHORtrueIan Ballard3252true1truePerspectivesPerspectivesPerspectivesperspectivestoc-heading33<p class="para" id="N65539"><b>What?</b> I consider myself privileged to divide my work time between my roles as a clinical simulation educator and as an intensive care nurse in a large teaching hospital. I find that working alternate weeks in educational and clinical roles can be challenging because both demand complementary but different skills. However, I am thrilled to have the opportunity to continue caring for patients alongside supporting and learning with colleagues. Balancing these roles during a pandemic presented me with new challenges and rewards, and reflection on these experiences has given me some fascinating insights. As the COVID-19 pandemic progressed and the number of patients requiring admission to the Critical Care Unit increased, the units were expanded and staff were redeployed from other areas to provide support. These ‘surge’ staff required rapidly developed simulation-based training to allow them to work in this unfamiliar environment within a restricted scope of practice. Being involved with delivering this training as well as working with surge staff in Critical Care afforded me a deeper understanding of the surge role and the unique challenges it presented. Once surge training was completed and I returned to delivering our standard simulation-based education courses, my experiences of working clinically continued to enrich my teaching because I felt somewhat familiar with some of the challenges our learners were facing as the pandemic continued.</p> <p class="para" id="N65544"><b>So what?</b> Over the last year, I have felt conflicted at times; when working clinically during the peak of the pandemic, there was very little time to facilitate learning at the bedside, and during my educator weeks I relished the opportunity to support and teach but felt guilty for spending time away from colleagues and patients in Critical Care Unit. However, continuing with both roles better equipped me to answer questions and to provide support during surge training, particularly for those staff who had not yet spent time on the units. When assisting with other courses as a faculty member, I was able to deeply empathize with participants who encountered situations that I had become familiar with in practice – for example, communicating with others when wearing full personal protective equipment – which helped me to validate and normalize some of the experiences shared during debrief discussions. Through continuing to reflect on my time spent working in these environments during the pandemic so far, I hope to present my learning and recommendations for optimizing practice under challenging circumstances.</p> 4193 Balancing Education and Practice: A Reflection from A Simulation Educator During The COVID-19 PandemicArticle1653694688865Qpjx6n0BEgXBsCdHN5ExQpjx6n0BEgXBsCdHN5Extrue193 Balancing Education and Practice: A Reflection from A Simulation Educator During The COVID-19 Pandemic2021falseAdi Health+Wellness193 Balancing Education and Practice: A Reflection from A Simulation Educator During The COVID-19 Pandemic110.54531/FBAX7346 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Guy’s &amp; St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust</institution>, London, <country>UK</country></sup></p>alice-boatfield-thorleyAUTHORtrueAlice Boatfield-Thorley3353true1truePerspectivesPerspectivesPerspectivesperspectivestoc-heading30<p class="para" id="N65539"><b>What?</b> At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, learner operating department practitioners (ODPs) were withdrawn from their clinical placements, thus removing their learning opportunities. This greatly affected their confidence and key knowledge. Staffordshire University adopted a blended learning approach to education for their Health and Social Care learners. This approach allowed the learners to attend campus for simulation sessions in small groups adhering toCOVID-19 guidelines of the University. This approach had some limitations; it identified a disparity in provision for those learners who were unable to attend in person due to isolating, shielding or home-schooling provisions. In response to this, we created a system using available technology to allow learners to actively participate in the simulation virtually. The virtual learners were included within the pre-brief, orientation to the equipment and surroundings, simulated sessions and post-simulation de-brief. The virtual learners were given objectives throughout the simulated session to ensure inclusivity and unity of direction, and were then included within the de-brief, which is arguably the most impactful phase of the simulation <sup>[1]</sup>; they were invited to share their findings so that they became an integral part of the conversation. This was achieved using Microsoft Teams, high-definition remote cameras including Scotia Medical Observation and Training System (SMOTS) and Bluetooth interface for sound control. The room was organized to offer a balanced view for both attendees and virtual learners. Additionally, adaptations were made to the delivery method to integrate both types of learners within the simulation.</p> <p class="para" id="N65547"><b>So what?</b> This project successfully allowed virtual learners who ordinarily would have missed the learning opportunity altogether to participate. Early feedback from the virtual learners proved this adaption successful; virtual learners reported feeling motivated and connected to the class. This approach could be adapted for future simulation sessions to ensure inclusivity for learners who are unable to attend campus.</p> 412 Remote Control: The Virtual Participant During SimulationArticle1653694687378P5jx6n0BEgXBsCdHHZE5P5jx6n0BEgXBsCdHHZE5true12 Remote Control: The Virtual Participant During Simulation2021falseAdi Health+Wellness12 Remote Control: The Virtual Participant During Simulation110.54531/VWPX3275 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Staffordshire University</institution>, Stafford, <country>UK</country></sup></p>dawn-sharmanAUTHORDawn Sharman3047 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Staffordshire University</institution>, Stafford, <country>UK</country></sup></p>ben-woodrow-hirstAUTHORtrueBen Woodrow-Hirst3048true1truePerspectivesPerspectivesPerspectivesperspectivestoc-heading26<p class="para" id="N65539"><b>What?</b> Our organization has been running some courses remotely since autumn 2020. Sessions for medical students and foundation doctors have taken place, allowing those who are isolating or shielding to participate, and facilitating the training of those who are outside our organization. We are now writing many courses with remote learning in mind and creating our course materials in digital format. This means that we are not starting from scratch if changes in circumstance prevent face-to-face training in the future. The remote format involves candidates controlling an ‘avatar’ in-centre, supported by a confederate (in nursing or junior doctor role), with access to a digital notes bundle. The screen on Microsoft Teams has a relatively fixed room view taking up the majority of the screen, with a change in feed to a different camera if appropriate to the flow of the scenario – to focus on the defibrillator, for example, with observations in a corner, and results popping up when requested. There is no option for candidates to alter this view. During a dry-run of a scenario involving a simulated patient (played by a faculty member) with hallucinations due to delirium, the candidate struggled in their appreciation of how abnormal the patient’s behaviours were, as they were unable to see all the small movements that were evident to those of us in the room, and low volume speech and muttering might have been difficult to hear, despite the faculty member wearing a microphone, though may have been easier through headphones. We sought feedback on the format and the feasibility for the scenario from the candidate, and the phrase ‘I didn’t see/hear that’ was used a lot.</p> <p class="para" id="N65544"><b>So what?</b> This has led me to wonder how much detail our candidates are dialling in from home, particularly those who are using a tablet, phone or laptop with a small screen, and have been missing, and how that might have affected their behaviour and clinical reasoning. Submitted feedback makes little reference to missing things in the course of the scenarios, but some candidates seem to have had more issues than others. This may have been due to technical or connectivity problems but could be viewed as a limitation of the set-up in its current format. Reviewing the feedback, while some expressed frustration about technical issues, there are many more comments about how they had enjoyed the experience and hoped it will continue. The jury seems to be out, but there is much to work on as we move forward.</p> 4186 Reflections on Remote Simulation: What Does This Mean That Candidates Miss?Article1653694690362O5jw6n0BEgXBsCdH7JH7O5jw6n0BEgXBsCdH7JH7true186 Reflections on Remote Simulation: What Does This Mean That Candidates Miss?2021falseAdi Health+Wellness186 Reflections on Remote Simulation: What Does This Mean That Candidates Miss?110.54531/FGFZ5705 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Trent Simulation and Clinical Skills Centre</institution>, Nottingham, <country>UK</country></sup></p>jennifer-taylorAUTHORtrueJennifer Taylor2640true1truePerspectivesPerspectivesPerspectivesperspectivestoc-heading31<p class="para" id="N65539"><b>What?</b> Immersive theatre is a style of theatre that removes the fourth wall of traditional theatre turning the audience into participants and engaging the five senses such as sight, sound, touch, taste and smell; a concept applied equally to multi-professional, human factor-based simulation. Peter Brook, one of our greatest theatre directors, says, ‘Drama is exposure; it is confrontation; it is a contradiction, and it leads to analysis, construction, recognition and eventually to an awakening of understanding’. This is without doubt what we do in simulation. We create scenarios, ‘the drama’, we create managing deteriorating patients, the ‘confrontation and contradiction’ and we enter debriefing, the ‘analysis, construction and eventual awakening of understanding’. Using the concepts of immersive theatre and drama, creating more realistic environments and authentic interactions, we can offer the participants a greater sense of reality in which to practice vital inter-professional medical care. High-fidelity simulation encompasses more than just a technological top of the range manikin which often comes at a premium cost. High-fidelity simulation is an attack on all of the senses, visually sick patients, noises and smells of the environment, even touch and taste. The soundscape of an emergency room, smells of humans, drugs, equipment, tastes of stewed tea and warm water, the touch of a sick patient or a disruptive relative in a visually authentic space creates the perfect setting for an immersive simulation experience.</p> <p class="para" id="N65544"><b>So what?</b> By implementing psychological, sociological and physical fidelity, we offer a unique way of practicing essential skills of interprofessional working not only to enhance patient care and safety but also to allow a greater understanding of ourselves and others in stressful, urgent and critical situations. Applying ideas from the world of drama and theatre, creating authentic immersive environments can give participants the freedom to be in the simulation and steer them away from acting in the simulation.</p> 4205 Simulation as a form of Immersive TheatreArticle1653694691854QJjx6n0BEgXBsCdHJJF0QJjx6n0BEgXBsCdHJJF0true205 Simulation as a form of Immersive Theatre2021falseAdi Health+Wellness205 Simulation as a form of Immersive Theatre110.54531/ESVA2083 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust</institution></sup></p>maria-espositoAUTHORtrueMaria Esposito3149true1trueIn PracticeIn PracticeIn Practicein-practicetoc-heading65<h3 class="BHead">Background:</h3> Accurate assessment of potential hazards and challenges within a home environment is essential to ensure the safety of our patients both post-discharge from hospital and within the community. Inter-professional education in this area allows students to learn from, with and about each other to provide more effective patient care. COVID-19 challenged the Arkansas Interprofessional Education Consortium (ARIPEC) to develop meaningful inter-professional activities while minimizing COVID-19 risk <sup>[1]</sup>. <h3 class="BHead">Aims:</h3> The aim of the study was to create and deliver a novel virtual home assessment simulation for inter-professional learners to improve the performance of home assessments state-wide. <h3 class="BHead">Method:</h3> Faculty from three universities created rooms within a simulated home assessment environment illustrating patient characteristics, hazards, habits and interpersonal considerations. Each university created and video recorded one simulated room (kitchen, bedroom and living room) which were combined in one video to represent a home. Students received pre-course material including education on the INHOMES tool and learning objectives before the virtual learning event. The brief included education on the importance of home assessment and the INHOMEs tool. The simulated home video was played to all students who subsequently were split into break-out rooms with facilitators. In inter-professional groups, students created action plans for immediate needs and for when weight-bearing status allowed increased mobility and identified professionals required to meet needs. Following this debriefs occurred in break-out rooms and then as a large group to summarize and identify take-aways. All students completed a pre-/post-questionnaire including the Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Survey (ICCAS) and evaluation of simulation methodology, home assessment and overall impression. Mean scores for 5-point Likert scores are reported. <h3 class="BHead">Results:</h3> In total, 400 students participated in the 2021 event, including medical, pharmacy, physician assistant, dental hygiene, communication science disorders, physical and occupational therapy, addiction studies, respiratory care, radiography, public health, sonography and nursing. All ICCAS metrics increased pre- to post-evaluation. See <a href="#T1">Table 1</a>. <div class="section"><div class="img" alt="Student evaluation data from the simulated home environment assessment activity"><div class="tableCaption"><div class="captionTitle"><div id="T1-no">Table 1:<div class="fullscreenIcon" onclick="javascript:showTableContent('T1');"><img src="/images/journalImg/maximize-2.png"/></div></div></div><div class="captionText" id="T1-text">Student evaluation data from the simulated home environment assessment activity</div></div><div class="tableView" id="T1-content"><table class="table"> <thead> <tr> <th align="left">Quality assessed</th> <th align="left">Mean Likert score (1 – strongly disagree, 5 – strongly agree)</th> </tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td align="left">Improve confidence</td> <td align="left">4.32</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">Improve communication skills</td> <td align="left">4.34</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">Improve reasoning skills</td> <td align="left">4.41</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">Improve decision-making skills</td> <td align="left">4.41</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">Helpful for professional development</td> <td align="left">4.46</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">More comfortable in completing home assessment to identify safety hazards and concerns</td> <td align="left">4.48</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">More comfortable to identify team members to meet the immediate and long-term needs of a patient with pain and limited mobility</td> <td align="left">4.48</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">The activity demonstrated the value of providing team-based home assessment education</td> <td align="left">4.54</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">Overall was a valuable educational activity</td> <td align="left">4.48</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">Simulation video portrayed the simulated environment well</td> <td align="left">4.5</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">Simulation video gave constructive indicators to identify patient characteristics and behaviours</td> <td align="left">4.53</td> </tr> <tr> <td align="left">Simulation provided an effective mechanism to learn home assessment using the INHOMES tool</td> <td align="left">4.52</td> </tr> </tbody> </table></div></div></div> <h3 class="BHead">Implications for practice:</h3> Our results demonstrate that a video-recorded simulated home environment event is successful in supporting the development of an inter-professional action plan for a home assessment using the INHOMES assessment tool. The collaborative creation of this event was essential due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but the efficacy for learning demonstrates the utility of this approach in the post-pandemic area. Virtual simulations increase accessibility for inter-professional learners to learn from, with and about each other for the benefit of our patients. 4102 Haunted House: The Dangers and Ghosts of The Lived EnvironmentArticle1653694708418YZhR7H0BEgXBsCdHvZFeYZhR7H0BEgXBsCdHvZFetrue102 Haunted House: The Dangers and Ghosts of The Lived Environment2021falseAdi Health+Wellness102 Haunted House: The Dangers and Ghosts of The Lived Environment110.54531/KOGI8266 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</institution>, Little Rock and Fayetteville, <country>USA</country></sup></p>kathryn-neillAUTHORKathryn Neill65153 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>2<span class="generated">] </span><institution>University of Central Arkansas</institution>, Conway, <country>USA</country></sup></p>duston-morrisAUTHORDuston Morris65154 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>3<span class="generated">] </span><institution>Harding University</institution>, Searcy, <country>USA</country></sup></p>debbie-knightAUTHORDebbie Knight65155 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</institution>, Little Rock and Fayetteville, <country>USA</country></sup></p>pamela-de-gravellesAUTHORPamela de Gravelles65156 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</institution>, Little Rock and Fayetteville, <country>USA</country></sup></p>angel-hollandAUTHORAngel Holland65157 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</institution>, Little Rock and Fayetteville, <country>USA</country></sup></p>wendy-wardAUTHORWendy Ward65158 <p class="captionText"><sup><span class="generated">[</span>1<span class="generated">] </span><institution>University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences</institution>, Little Rock and Fayetteville, <country>USA</country></sup></p>karen-dickinsonAUTHORtrueKaren Dickinson651595765174truefalse